2015.04.08 16:05:35

 

Pass the Peace, Please

Order of Worship, Audio


Dear Friends,

 

I came across an article entitled "Who comes to church on the Sunday after Easter?" The writer suggests that those in attendance could be characterized in one of two groups. The first group is made up of the faithful who deeply believe. The second are those few who have returned after visiting last Sunday to see if what was said about Easter was real and true.


The scripture for this week (John 20:19-31) offers us an answer to that question.   The setting is the first day after Easter and the disciples have locked themselves in a house in fear of what is going to happen next. Jesus appears to them and allays their fears, giving them hope for the future and renewing their call to be the church in his name. All seems to be better until they realize that Thomas, a leader among them, had missed this post-resurrection meeting. The remainder of the passage is a teaching for all of us "who have not seen and yet have come to believe."


See you Sunday,


Martha

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield


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2015.04.02 16:44:48


Family Easter Service

Saturday, April 4th, 5:00 pm

Easter and the Rock that Rolled

Order of Worship



Traditional Easter Service

Sunday, April 5th, 8:15 and 10:00 am

Death Is Strong, but Life is Stronger

Order of Worship, Audio



Dear Easter People,

 

E. Stanley Jones wrote of the early disciples that "they had little ritual but a mighty realization. They went out not remembering Christ, but experiencing him. He was not a mere fair and beautiful story to remember with gratitude - he was a living, redemptive, actual presence then and there. They went out with the joyous and grateful cry, "Christ lives in me!" The Jesus of history had become the Christ of experience."

 

Isn't this really the answer to our deepest longings - to experience the power and the grace of God in living relationship with Jesus Christ? To trust that God is alive, transforming our losses and our grief into new beginnings and renewed hope. That is the experience of Easter. This Saturday night and Sunday morning, we come to attest to the experiences that we have had that we are not alone or rejected or washed up. We come to sing "Alleluia' for Christ lives in us!

 

Our Easter scripture is John's account of the empty tomb (John 20:19-31). On Saturday night, Kim Ports will lead the creative and highly energetic Family Service at 5:00 pm. On Sunday morning at our regular times, our Celebration and Bell Tones Choirs will join a brass quintet to present festival music. The sermon title is "Death is Strong, But Life is Stronger." There will be a children's message at both services as well as childcare and Sunday School at 10:00.

 

I hope you will experience the fullness of the Christian story by attending the Maundy Thursday service tonight at 7:00 pm in the sanctuary. In that service, we will share in Holy Communion and the ritual of hand washing that reminds us of Jesus' call to his disciples to "love one another." On Good Friday, the Fireside Room will be set up as a chapel for personal prayers and meditation from 9:00 am - 12:00 pm and communion will be served at noon.

 

In Christ,


Martha

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield


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2015.03.26 16:32:29

When Love Comes to Town

Order of Worship, Audio


Dear Friends,

 

The dual nature of Palm/Passion Sunday comes from the merger of two traditions into one day. Palm Sunday commemorates Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem. Passion Sunday observes the biblical narrative of Jesus’ suffering. Prior to the merger of these two days, many people went from waving palms to celebrating resurrection without hearing the story of the Last Supper, the betrayal, arrest, trial and crucifixion and burial of Jesus. In worship this Sunday, we will hear the story from Mark 11:1-11 about Jesus’ parade into Jerusalem. But, we cannot read this story without recognizing that from the moment he climbs down from the colt he is riding, his feet are directed toward the cross where he will die. And so on Sunday, while we wave palm branches and sing the lovely words “Hosanna, Loud Hosanna”, we will remember that those words translate to the cry ”Save us.” This bold request we sing about with excitement and anticipation on Sunday will be fulfilled through the saving deed of Christ on the cross on Good Friday.

 

I invite you to fully participate in the events and services of this week that are listed on our website. It is a week filled with poignancy and beauty and truth both painful and resplendent with hope.

 

Martha

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield


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2015.03.18 18:08:40

Theology of Baseball - Rev. Mark Trotter

Order of Worship, Audio


Dear Friends,


I have invited my father, Rev. Mark Trotter, to preach this week in worship. On this final week in the Lenten season, his sermon is entitled, “The Theology of Baseball.” The texts for the service are Romans 5:1-11 and John 4:5-30. It is always a personal pleasure to have my father here to teach or preach for our congregation and I know you will be moved by his sermon on Sunday.

 

Many have requested the prayer by Mother Teresa that I used in last Sunday’s sermon. I have published it below for your meditation.

 

I look forward to seeing you on Sunday.


Martha

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield



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2015.03.10 18:59:10

The Thirst of God

Order of Worship, Audio


Dear Friends,

 

I have a friend who will sometimes ask me what I am preaching on Sunday. When she asked this week, I said, "John 3:16." "O boy," she said, rather ambivalently.  John 3:16 is what we might call "a loaded passage."  It carries with it so much weighty baggage on the part of many people.  As one writer puts it, this passage "demands attention to what it is, what it isn't, what we want it to be or what we think it is."  It is a passage that is read by some as welcoming and open and by others as terribly exclusionary.  So, let's look at the whole passage of John 3:1-21, beginning with the introduction of Nicodemus, the Pharisee who is the one to whom the conversation is addressed.  As a Pharisee, Nicodemus is used to a very structured society where it is clear who is "in" and who is "out."  He is surprised to hear that Jesus tells him that God loves the whole world.

 

See you Sunday, 

 

Martha

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield



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2015.03.04 20:16:59

Holy Anger

Order of Worship, Audio


Dear Friends,


 

Our passage this week has Jesus in a spring-cleaning frenzy (John 2:13-22). He has come to proclaim the good news but is not willing to do it in a Temple that has been turned into a marketplace. So, he turns over the tables, dumps out the cash drawers and sends the merchants away. But this display of holy anger on Jesus’ part is not just about respect for the Temple as a holy place where one meets God. As usual, Jesus is operating on more than one level. The temple he refers to is his own body that will be torn down and rebuilt in three days. John’s gospel telling suggests that God is no longer available only through the Temple sacrifices that are made in order to gain access. In the new covenant, access to God is gained through faith in his son, who invites us to full relationship with God by giving, not doves and goats in sacrifice, but by giving ourselves.

 

See you Sunday,


Martha

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield



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2015.02.25 17:38:53

A Showdown with Oneself

Order of Worship, Audio


Dear Friends,

 

In preparation for our time in worship this week, I invite you to mull over a word that is in this week's passage, Mark 8:31-38. That word is "deny." In Greek, the word carries just these two meanings:

 

  1.     to affirm that one has no acquaintance or connection with someone
  2.     to forget one's self, lose sight of one's self and one's own interests

"Deny" is used consistently in two ways in the New Testament. It is used either in regards to Peter and his denial of knowing Jesus - either predicted by Jesus or the actual "rooster crowing" denial that occurs in the synoptic gospels. Or, it is used by Jesus when he tells us that we must deny ourselves, take up our cross and follow him.

 

"Deny" either brings us closer to one another or it separates us more severely. To deny knowing someone else, means that you are not related to them on any level. When Peter said, "I'm not with him," he was looking out only for himself. He cut himself off from his community.

 

However, to accept Jesus' call to "deny oneself, to take up a cross and follow," puts you in immediate relationship to others. One use of the word "deny" opens a door. The other slams it shut. The way "deny" is used is either the means of falling away from faithfulness to God's call or it is the threshold to a life of community and love of neighbor.

I welcome your responses and look forward to seeing you on Sunday.

 

In Christ,

 

Martha

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield  



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2015.02.19 16:04:10

40 Days and 40 Nights

Order of Worship, Audio


Dear Friends,


At the Ash Wednesday service, I offered the following invitation to observe a Holy Lent. I share it with our whole church family as a guide to living out an intentional Lenten Season:

 

Every year at Easter, we celebrate with joy our redemption and renewal through

      the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

 

The season of Lent is a time to prepare for this celebration and to make

     room in our lives for the Spirit of God to renew us in this mystery.

 

We begin this holy season by acknowledging our need for repentance and

     our need for the love and forgiveness shown to us in Jesus Christ. I

     invite you, therefore, in the name of Christ, to observe a Holy Lent,

by self-examination and penitence,

by prayer and fasting,

by practicing works of love,

and by reading and reflecting on God's Holy word.

 

Let us begin our Lenten journey by together confessing our sins and seeking the forgiveness  

     and new life that is promised to us in Christ Jesus.

 

Historically, Lent developed as a season of preparing persons for baptism in the church at Easter. The 40 days grew out of this time of preparation for the whole church for the great celebration at Easter. This was also the period when those who had been alienated and lapsed from the church could be reconciled and restored to fellowship. The recovery of the rhythm of preparation and celebration of the Lent-Easter season will revitalize both our congregational worship life and our personal faith journeys.

 

This Sunday, our text is Mark 1:9-15 and is the story of Jesus' time in the wilderness. The title of the sermon is "40 Days and 40 Nights."

 

See you Sunday,


Martha

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield  


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2015.02.18 23:07:45

Ash Wednesday Service

Order of Worship


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2015.02.12 17:11:23

The Faraway Nearby

Order of Worship, Audio


Dear Friends,      

 

The start of the Epiphany season began with the star leading the wise men to meet the long awaited Messiah. Their encounter with this baby transformed their lives and brought into focus their priorities, symbolized by their choice to "go home by another way." On this last Sunday of the Epiphany season, the light of a single star is contrasted with great heavenly light that surrounds Jesus during his Transfiguration. Of all the revelatory stories about Jesus' identity that have directed our worship the last six weeks, the Transfiguration story is the glorious climax where God identifies Jesus with the same title as was affirmed at his baptism. This time, however, God directs the disciples (and therefore all of us) "to listen to him!" (Mark 9:2-9)  The title of the sermon is "The Faraway Nearby."

 

We have a fun weekend ahead of us with performances by Higher Ground on Saturday and Sunday, and a reception of new members on Sunday.

 

In Christ,  

  

Martha

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield



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2015.02.05 17:02:39

One Last Request

    Order of Worship, Audio


Dear Friends,


This week we welcome Rev. Rob Calderhead to the pulpit. Rob is a retired member of our Annual Conference and served as interim pastor here at San Carlos several years ago. Rob pastored several churches as Senior Minister, including Hope UMC in Rancho Bernardo and West Hills UMC. His text for this week is John 21:15-17 and the title of the sermon is "One Last Request." We welcome Rob to San Carlos this Sunday.


In Christ,


Martha

 

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield  


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2015.01.29 17:16:45

The People Who Could Fly

    Order of Worship, Audio


 

Dear Friends,


This Sunday, millions of people will watch the New England Patriots and the Seattle Sea Hawks face off in the Super Bowl. And as it happens, the Scripture reading for worship is Isaiah 40:21-31, a favorite among those who like to mix their football with a little scripture.

 

"Even youths will faint and be weary, and the young will fall exhausted; but those who wait for the LORD shall renew their strength, they shall mount up with wings like eagles, they shall run and not be weary, they shall walk and not faint"

(Isaiah 40:30-31 NRSV).

 

I'm not going to talk about football on Sunday but I do want to share this excerpt from an article by Kathryn Shifferdecker who makes the connection between this text and the big game.

 

"...this passage from Isaiah is a biblical text that every Christian athlete from high school to the NFL seems to know and hold dear. Isaiah 40:31 is among the biblical citations that Tim Tebow emblazoned on his eye black during his days as quarterback for the Florida Gators...

 

Does God care about who wins a football game? I doubt it. Does God care about the people playing the football game and those watching them? Yes, most certainly."

 

So, come to church this Sunday, bring a bag of canned goods for our Soup-er Bowl Food Drive to benefit the Good Neighbor Center and may the best team win!


See you Sunday in church.

 

In Christ,

 

Martha

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield  



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2015.01.22 16:15:30

     The Wideness of God's Mercy

  Order of Worship, Audio

 

So Jonah cleaned up and went on his way

To Nineveh for he had to say.

“Repent today or you will pay!”

and all the town’s people said, “OK!”

 

Dear Friends,


I guess because of the whale episode, the story of Jonah is often considered a good story for the kid’s. But, the whale part is really the least of it. The story of Jonah is a moral tale like Aesop’s fables. It’s purpose is to teach us something about ourselves. It is also, in its hyperbolic style, a parable, so it is meant to teach us about the nature of God. The designers of the lectionary put it in this particular place in the cycle of readings to contrast Jonah’s refusal to accept God’s call with the disciple’s enthusiastic submission to Jesus’ invitation in Mark 1:14 -20. The book of Jonah is a short story that you can read in ten minutes but its message may disturb you for a lot longer than that. I encourage you to read all of Jonah in preparation for Sunday when we will wrestle with this wonderful story. The title of the sermon is “The Wideness of God’s Mercy.”  

 

See you Sunday in church.


In Christ,


Martha

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield  


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2015.01.15 15:41:08

     Come and See

  Order of Worship, Audio


Dear Friends,    


Some things you just can't convince people about; you have to let them experience it themselves. Our passage tells of one of those encounters. In John 1:43-51, Jesus has begun to call his disciples. In Galilee, he finds Philip and Philip follows him. He is converted and convicted about having found and been found by "the one whom Moses and the prophets wrote." Excited about this transformation in his life, he goes home and tells his friend, Nathanael. Nathanael has his reservations based on some hometown biases. So, rather than try to convince Nathanael, Philip offers him three of the most powerful words in the Bible, "Come and See." And with that confident invitation, he offers Christ to his neighbor. Since those words say it all, I'm using them as the title of this week's sermon.


This is an important Sunday for a number of reasons. Breaking from the tradition of having a UMW Sunday in August, I am going to acknowledge the United Methodist Women for their good work this Sunday. As a congregation, we will install their officers and celebrate their ministry among us. Members of our unit will serve as ushers and liturgists in the service.

 

Also, as we close the financial books on 2014, I have asked outgoing Finance Chair, Bob Zentmyer, to give us a stewardship update. And then finally, we will offer a blessing for two of our own, Carolyn Ingram and Ruth O'Neil, who are headed for mission service in Guatemala next week. In addition to all that, the Bell Tones will ring. The Celebration Choir will sing. It's going to be a good day to invite someone to "Come and See!"  

 

See you Sunday in church.


In Christ,


Martha

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield  


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2015.01.08 17:35:42

 

    Baptism in the Wilderness

Order of Worship, Audio


Dear Friends,

 

Last time we heard from John the Baptist was a few weeks ago. His Advent message was "to prepare the way of the Lord." Now, we are in Epiphany and back at the same river where John is baptizing that long awaited Messiah. The way was prepared and God announces as Jesus rises from the water that he is the one for whom we have been waiting. God announces his pleasure to those gathered around with a parental blessing that any child would cherish hearing. "This is my son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased."

 

That affirmation and claiming as God's own beloved is the message of baptism. God loves us, claims us and calls us his own. This Sunday, on the day we hear the story of the baptism of Jesus, we will share in the congregational ritual of remembrance of baptism. Baptism is a singular sacrament. It only happens once. But the message of our baptisms is something that we ought to remember over and over again. When you touch the water this week, remember that you are a cherished son or daughter of God with whom God is well pleased.

 

See you Sunday in church.

 

In Christ,


Martha

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield


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2014.12.23 16:31:20

     Another Way Home

Order of Worship, Audio


O star of wonder, star of light

Star with royal beauty bright.

Westward leading, still proceeding

Guide us to thy perfect light.

 

The visit of the Wise Men or Magi to the infant Jesus is celebrated every year on January 6th and is observed in church on the Sunday closest to it. So, Sunday, we begin Epiphany. In this light-filled season, the readings deal with Jesus’ identity, beginning with this visit of the three strangers who are led by a star to the manger. The guiding image of Epiphany is light, which represents the recognition of Jesus as God with us. Each scripture helps us to piece together who Jesus really is. First of all, the wise men, strangers “not like us,” are drawn to the manger of this Jewish baby and find great meaning for their lives. In Jesus’ baptism, rising from the water, God acknowledges Jesus with the words, “This is my son, in whom I am well pleased.” The ultimate revelation comes on the last Sunday of the season, Transfiguration Sunday, when God acknowledges Jesus as the chosen one in whom God is well pleased.

 

In worship on Sunday morning, we will focus on Matthew 2:1-12 and begin our year sharing in the sacrament of Holy Communion. The sermon is titled, “Another Way Home.” We will also dedicate our Imagine No Malaria offerings so please return your net bags if you have not already done so.

 

May the light of Christ shine on you this season,


Martha

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield



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2014.12.23 16:19:57

 

    Simeon's Song

Order of Worship, Audio

Dear Friends,

 

By the time you read this, we all will have had our Christmas Day.  Our Advent waiting is over and we have heard the story reach its fulfillment.  God is with us.  Emmanuel.  Well, our scripture this week tells the story of one man’s experience of his waiting fulfilled.  Simeon was an old man to whom it had been revealed that he would not die before he would see Christ with his own eyes.  And so he waited and waited at the Temple.  And on the day when Mary and Joseph brought their baby to the Temple for his dedication, Simeon spied the baby and suddenly knew that he was the one who had been promised. His waiting is over.  The promise had been fulfilled.  And the exuberant old man sings the most lovely song, “Lord, let thy servant depart in peace, according to thy word; for my eyes have seen thy salvation” (Luke 2:22-40.)  To preach on this wonderful text, we welcome my father, Rev. Mark Trotter, to the pulpit this Sunday. Rev. Trotter served as Senior Minister at First Church, San Diego for 24 years.  Since his retirement in 2000, he continues to preach and teach at churches throughout San Diego and is active in many civic and philanthropic organizations.  Carolyn Ingram will lead the service and there will be special music by Higher Ground and Winnie Willis. It will be a great Sunday.

 

 

In Christ,


Martha

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield

By the time you read this, we all will have had our Christmas Day.  Our Advent waiting is over and we have heard the story reach its fulfillment.  God is with us.  Emmanuel.  Well, our scripture this week tells the story of one man’s experience of his waiting fulfilled.  Simeon was an old man to whom it had been revealed that he would not die before he would see Christ with his own eyes.  And so he waited and waited at the Temple.  And on the day when Mary and Joseph brought their baby to the Temple for his dedication, Simeon spied the baby and suddenly knew that he was the one who had been promised. His waiting is over.  The promise had been fulfilled.  And the exuberant old man sings the most lovely song, “Lord, let they thy? servant depart in peace, according to thy word; for my eyes have seen they thy? salvation” (Luke 2:22-40.)  To preach on this wonderful text, we welcome my father, Rev. Mark Trotter, to the pulpit this Sunday. Rev. Trotter served as Senior Minister at First Church, San Diego for 24 years.  Since his retirement in 2000, he continues to preach and teach at churches throughout San Diego and is active in many civic and philanthropic organizations.  Carolyn Ingram will lead the service and there will be special music by Higher Ground and Winnie Willis. It will be a great Sunday.


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2014.12.23 15:51:02

Family Christmas Eve Worship Service

Order of Worship


    Traditional Christmas Eve Worship Service

Order of Worship


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2014.12.17 22:53:07

Nothing is Impossible

Order of Worship, Audio


    Blue Christmas Service

Order of Worship


 

Dear Friends,


We are nearing the end of our season of anticipation and waiting. For a month now the scriptures have been telling us to be alert and watch for the signs that a change is about to happen. We were forewarned by a strange man dressed in camel’s hair to prepare the way of the Lord. We have moved from darkness into graduated levels of light that make the message of Christmas ever more clear and vibrant.


In this fourth week of Advent, as we are so close to the fulfillment of all for which we have been waiting, we look to the stories of the Bible, and to the carols and the anthems of the choir to announce the meaning of this holy season. The example we are given this week is Mary - the poor, young girl whom God chose to bring his love into the world. Her obedience to that call exemplifies what it means to be a vessel of God’s love. The text for this week is Luke 1:26-38. The title of the sermon is “Nothing is Impossible.” 


See you Sunday in church,


Martha

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield




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2014.12.11 17:07:14

The Christmas Jubilee

Order of Worship, Audio


 

Dear Friends,

 

Our countdown to the manger continues this week. In the Advent season, the third Sunday is designated as “Rejoice” Sunday. This break in “purple preparation” is marked by the lighting of the pink candle in the Advent wreath. “Rejoice” Sunday is sort of like shaking the presents under the tree. Our excitement mounts, as we get closer to the fulfillment of our waiting. On this day, we get a glimpse of the great joy that will come to us at Christmas. The scriptures reflect this anticipated rejoicing in two passages – Isaiah 61:1-4, 8-11 and I Thessalonians 5:16-24. They both speak of that great day when God will accomplish justice and peace for all people.

 

The Isaiah passage is familiar not only because we hear it every Advent season but because it also makes up Jesus’ first public words in the Gospel of Luke. After his temptation in the desert, Jesus "returned to Galilee in the power of the Spirit." He entered a synagogue in Nazareth where he had grown up, and when he was invited to speak he unrolled a scroll and read from the poetry of Isaiah (Isaiah 61:1–3):


The Spirit of the Sovereign Lord is on me,

     because the Lord has anointed me

     to preach good news to the poor.

He has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted,

     to proclaim freedom for the captives

     and release for the prisoners,

to proclaim the year of the Lord's favor

     and the day of vengeance of our God,

to comfort all who mourn,

     and provide for those who grieve in Zion—

to bestow on them a crown of beauty

     instead of ashes,

the oil of gladness

     instead of mourning,

and a garment of praise

     instead of a spirit of despair.

 

When Jesus finished, writes Luke, he rolled up the scroll, handed it to the attendant, and sat down. With "the eyes of everyone in the synagogue fastened on him," Jesus then boldly declared: "Today this scripture is fulfilled in your hearing." That is, his entire life, death and resurrection were given to fulfill these ancient words of Isaiah. We will be led by these words this week in worship.

 

See you Sunday in church,


Martha

Rev. Martha T. Wingfield


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